GATEKEEPERS JACQUES STEINBERG PDF

This nonfiction book reads like a work of fiction. It's not cold and dry nor presented too factually. The author shadows a college admissions recruiter through the process at Wesleyan. This is truly a fascinating book, from a collegiate standpoint. Being a college student with a prospect of transferring, I was attuned to the novel since many of the cases shed light upon a seemingly

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book.

Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — The Gatekeepers by Jacques Steinberg. In the fall of , New York Times education reporter Jacques Steinberg was given an unprecedented opportunity to observe the admissions process at prestigious Wesleyan University.

Over the course of nearly a year, Steinberg accompanied admissions officer Ralph Figueroa on a tour to assess and recruit the most promising students in the country. The Gatekeepers follows a d In the fall of , New York Times education reporter Jacques Steinberg was given an unprecedented opportunity to observe the admissions process at prestigious Wesleyan University.

The Gatekeepers follows a diverse group of prospective students as they compete for places in the nation's most elite colleges. The first book to reveal the college admission process in such behind-the-scenes detail, The Gatekeepers will be required reading for every parent of a high school-age child and for every student facing the arduous and anxious task of applying to college.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published July 29th by Penguin Books first published September 16th More Details Original Title. Other Editions 9. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Gatekeepers , please sign up. Lists with This Book.

Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Dec 15, Kressel Housman rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction , education. Another reviewer said that this book is guaranteed to give high school kids a nervous breakdown, and I'm sure it's true because I'm over 40, and it's given me a mid-life crisis.

Reading it brought me right back to my high school and college years, except that now with an adult's perspective, I can see all my mistakes more clearly than ever. I kid you not; I spent several sleepless nights obsessing about things like "If only I'd taken more AP classes," "If only I'd understood that the letter I go Another reviewer said that this book is guaranteed to give high school kids a nervous breakdown, and I'm sure it's true because I'm over 40, and it's given me a mid-life crisis.

I kid you not; I spent several sleepless nights obsessing about things like "If only I'd taken more AP classes," "If only I'd understood that the letter I got from College X meant that they really wanted me," "If only I'd listened to my intuition and not to labels," "I made such bad decisions; why didn't I get more guidance?

You'd think that since the book had such a negative effect on me, I wouldn't give it a 5, but I figure, if a book is that powerful, it deserves it. It did what it set out to do, which is to inform the reader about the admissions process, and made it a grippingly human story by focusing on people, Wesleyan admissions officer Ralph Figueroa and six applicants he considered for the class of Some were accepted, some were rejected, and some were wait-listed, but whatever the outcome, incredible human consideration went into each decision.

Contrary to what I thought, the admissions process is neither cold nor impersonal. Ralph and his colleagues really do read those entrance essays. In fact, he used to read his favorites to his wife.

Applicant Jordan Goldman won Ralph over with his essay on his friendship with a handicapped boy, which came as a big surprise to Jordan. He thought it was the recommendation he got from a famous published author. As much as I might wish it, I can't turn back the clock and undo my mistakes. But I can change my present, and since reading this book, I've been seriously considering graduate school.

I know that part of my motivation is a poor one. I want the validation of an admissions committee putting the words "would add" [to this institution] on my application. But on the other side, I feel this is one way to really reach my potential.

When I went to college, I had no kind of career goal, no idea what I wanted to be when I grew up. But now I am grown up, so perhaps I can use a graduate level education to better advantage than I did my undergraduate.

Gut-wrenching as this book was for me, I recommend this book to all parents who intend to send their kids to college, probably before sophomore year, and then coach their kids through the admissions process.

Perhaps some kids have the inner grit to read it themselves, but if it put me through the ringer 20 years after I was in the middle of the admissions process, how much anxiety-producing for them?

View all 5 comments. Jul 10, Jean rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction. I read this book grudgingly for work, but ended up really liking it. It shows admissions counselors for the subjective, tired, overworked, and generally genuinely caring people they are. Moreover, it shows college admissions for what it is: an equally subjective process in which any rule can operate OR be broken for any applicant at any time.

Where you get in is not who you are or how good you are. This is probably one of the most depressing books I've ever read. Although Steinberg seems to have no particular mission for this work, it is truly an expose in the arbitrary decisions that are made by college admissions committees.

Perhaps the saddest part is the coda, wherein two students who were accepted despite mediocre grades and SAT scores were unable to handle the academic work and had to take time off from college, whereas two students who were rejected despite great SAT scores soared a This is probably one of the most depressing books I've ever read.

Perhaps the saddest part is the coda, wherein two students who were accepted despite mediocre grades and SAT scores were unable to handle the academic work and had to take time off from college, whereas two students who were rejected despite great SAT scores soared at their back up schools.

It really highlights how unfair the process has been to both sets of students. I'll admit that I was emotionally invested from the beginning. Like Jordan, everyone assured me that I would get into Brown So, like Jordan, I want to a mid-tier liberal arts college that was anxious to snap up the Ivy League's remnants although unlike Jordan, I was savvy enough to choose one that gave me a substantial merit scholarship.

Unlike Jordan, I never got over Brown, and deeply resent the four years I spent with coursework that failed to challenge me, and classmates who were not my intellectual equals. For others in the same boat, take heart: despite going to a mid-rung college, I managed to get into a top-tier medical school, and thereafter a top-tier residency. Work hard and make the best of it; the rest of the world is not as fickle as undergrad admissions. View all 3 comments.

Apr 17, Lisa McKenzie rated it really liked it. If you are in the market for books about college admissions, give yourself a treat and read this well researched, tastefully dramatized account of a year in the life of a dedicated, highly principled, woefully underpaid, college admissions officer. I found myself becoming almost as passionate as he was about his top picks, agreeing with some of his decisions, disagreeing with others, discovering in the process that my biases—and his—have more to do with personal past experience than actual evide If you are in the market for books about college admissions, give yourself a treat and read this well researched, tastefully dramatized account of a year in the life of a dedicated, highly principled, woefully underpaid, college admissions officer.

I found myself becoming almost as passionate as he was about his top picks, agreeing with some of his decisions, disagreeing with others, discovering in the process that my biases—and his—have more to do with personal past experience than actual evidence at hand. Happily, this book contains an epilogue, which describes the fate of the college prospects.

My judgements faced a comeuppance or two, and so did the admissions officer's. It was fun to witness the whole fraught process with the God's eye view of a benevolent omniscient narrator.

Jacques Steinberg was kind to all the individuals he described, but he was also unsparing. Wesleyan University comes off as something less than a prize. I hope I gained enough perspective from this book to remember that the admissions process is highly subjective, and therefore somewhat random, and should never be viewed as a referendum on the worth of any human being.

View 1 comment. Jan 18, Devin Wallace rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , education. The Gatekeepers is both an intelligent expose of the college admissions system and yet a frightening picture of what is, and will continue to be, a maddening system of partial judges.

While it may paint a bleak picture of the higher education landscape one that is becoming more exclusive every day , the Gatekeepers seeks to and succeeds in shed light on an admissions system plagued by too many applicants and too few admissions officers. At times, it will drive you insane to see students wtih The Gatekeepers is both an intelligent expose of the college admissions system and yet a frightening picture of what is, and will continue to be, a maddening system of partial judges.

At times, it will drive you insane to see students wtih the right credentials be denied admission in favor of someone "lesser. People with a variety of talents and backgrounds are recognized for their unique abilities out of the classroom.

While it only profiles one college mainly, and others offhand, it provides a better description than many traditional guidebooks into the college admissions process. Nov 19, Diane rated it it was amazing. I usually try not to read work-related books for fun, but this account of the college admissions process really drew me in.

I got so invested in all the characters who are real people! It is so impressive that the author was able to get such an ins I usually try not to read work-related books for fun, but this account of the college admissions process really drew me in.

It is so impressive that the author was able to get such an insider view of the admissions process props to Wesleyan for allowing this level of transparency and that all the players were willing to let this stranger into their lives -- especially the students and their families.

This book helped cast light on a process that has always been a great mystery to me - why some students get into a particular college and not others - and what the process of choosing who gets in and when reveals about our beliefs about merit and fairness.

Mar 09, Jennifer rated it really liked it Recommended to Jennifer by: Mom. Fascinating behind the scenes look at the college admissions process.

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This nonfiction book reads like a work of fiction. It's not cold and dry nor presented too factually. The author shadows a college admissions recruiter through the process at Wesleyan. This is truly a fascinating book, from a collegiate standpoint. Being a college student with a prospect of transferring, I was attuned to the novel since many of the cases shed light upon a seemingly

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