APHIS NERII PDF

The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report. Insects associated with milkweed Calotropis procera Ait.

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Oleander aphid. The Oleander aphid is a bright yellow insect with black legs, and stalks known as cornicles on the back of the abdomen.

It is commonly found on oleander, butterfly weed and milkweed, appearing on buds, new shoots and foliage in the spring. Large colonies often develop over the summer and may cause injury or death of the host plant. The Oleander aphid reproduces entirely by parthenogenesis without fertilization. Both winged and wingless females reproduce this way so, at least in the wild, no male Oleander aphids occur.

The females are also viviparous , meaning that they do not produce eggs but instead give birth to live young called nymphs, the adult female's clones. Aphids are polymorphic — they have different body forms under different circumstances. Adults can be wingless apterous or winged alate. Winged adult females are usually only seen when the host plant is no longer viable, or when a colony becomes overcrowded to the point where migration to other host plants must occur.

Learn more! Borror , Donald J. New York : Houghton Mifflin Co. Species Aphis nerii - Oleander Aphid. Like other aphids the Oleander aphid secretes a viscous sugary substance known as honeydew. This secretion is greedily sought after by other insects, especially ants. Some ants live in close proximity to, and tend to aphids.

As honeydew accumulates on the leaves, a black sooty mold often follows and can be unsightly. Wingless female giving birth The Oleander aphid reproduces entirely by parthenogenesis without fertilization. Nymph Molting Nymph with wing buds Winged female Aphids are polymorphic — they have different body forms under different circumstances. Mummy Many Oleander aphids are attacked by the parasitic wasp, Lysiphlebus testaceipes Cresson Hymenoptera: Braconidae.

Featured Creatures, Dept. Nymph with wing buds. Winged female Aphids are polymorphic — they have different body forms under different circumstances. On milkweed.

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Aphis nerii

The prevalent way aphids accomplish colony defense against natural enemies is a mutualistic relationship with ants or the occurrence of a specialised soldier caste typcial for eusocial aphids, or even both. Despite a group-living life style of those aphid species lacking these defense lines, communal defense against natural predators has not yet been observed there. Individuals of Aphis nerii Oleander aphid and Uroleucon hypochoeridis , an aphid species feeding on Hypochoeris radicata hairy cat's ear , show a behavioral response to visual stimulation in the form of spinning or twitching, which is often accompanied by coordinated kicks executed with hind legs. Interestingly, this behaviour is highly synchronized among members of a colony and repetitive visual stimulation caused strong habituation.

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This adventive aphid is found in many countries especially in tropical and subtropical regions including many Pacific islands. It is believed to have spread from the Mediterranean region where it lived on Oleander, Nerium oleander. It is mainly found plants in the family Apocynaceae, but it has not been recorded from native Parsonsia species. It is regarded as a pest of Swan plants. Conservation status : It is mainly found plants in the family Apocynaceae.

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Oleander aphid. The Oleander aphid is a bright yellow insect with black legs, and stalks known as cornicles on the back of the abdomen. It is commonly found on oleander, butterfly weed and milkweed, appearing on buds, new shoots and foliage in the spring. Large colonies often develop over the summer and may cause injury or death of the host plant. The Oleander aphid reproduces entirely by parthenogenesis without fertilization.

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