BASAVANNA VACHANAGALU IN KANNADA PDF

Account Options Sign in. Top charts. New releases. Add to Wishlist. Basavanna was a 12th-century Hindu philosopher, statesman, Kannada poet in the Niraakaara Shiva-focussed Bhakti movement and a social reformer during the reign of the Kalachuri-dynasty king Bijjala I in Karnataka, India. Basavanna spread social awareness through his poetry, popularly known as Vachanaas.

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Basavanna was active during the rule of both dynasties but reached his peak of influence during the rule of King Bijjala II in Karnataka , India. Basavanna spread social awareness through his poetry, popularly known as Vachanaas. As the chief minister of his kingdom, he introduced new public institutions such as the Anubhava Mantapa or, the "hall of spiritual experience" , [7] which welcomed men and women from all socio-economic backgrounds to discuss spiritual and mundane questions of life, in open.

The traditional legends and hagiographic texts state Basava to be the founder of the Lingayats. However, modern scholarship relying on historical evidence such as the Kalachuri inscriptions state that Basava was the poet philosopher who revived, refined and energized an already existing tradition. Basavanna literary works include the Vachana Sahitya in Kannada Language. He is also known as Bhaktibhandari literally, the treasurer of devotion , [12] Basavanna or Basaveswara.

Basavanna was born in CE [1] in the town of Basavan bagewadi in the northern part of Karnataka , to Madarasa and Madalambike, a Kannada Brahmin family [13] devoted to Hindu deity Shiva. Basavanna grew up in Kudalasangama northwest Karnataka , near the banks of rivers Krishna and its tributary Malaprabha. Basavanna married Gangambike , [12] a cousin from his mother's side. Her father was the provincial prime minister of Bijjala , the Kalachuri king.

The king also married Basava's sister named Nagamma. As chief minister of the kingdom, Basavanna used the state treasury to initiate social reforms and religious movement focussed on reviving Shaivism, recognizing and empowering ascetics who were called Jangamas. Several works are attributed to Basavanna, which are revered in the Lingayat community.

These include various Vachana [1] such as the Shat-sthala-vachana discourses of the six stages of salvation , Kala-jnana-vachana forecasts of the future , Mantra-gopya , Ghatachakra-vachana and Raja-yoga-vachana.

The Basava Purana , a Telugu biographical epic poem, first written by Palkuriki Somanatha in 13th-century, [17] and an updated 14th century Kannada version, written by Bhima Kavi in , are sacred texts in Lingayatism.

Other hagiographic works include the 15th-century Mala Basava-raja-charitre and the 17th-century Vrishabhendra Vijaya , both in Kannada. Scholars state that the poems and legends about Basava were written down long after Basava's death.

Michael states, "All 'Vachana'collections as they exist at present are probably much later than the 15th-century [ years post-Basava]. Much critical labor needs to be spent in determining the authenticity of portions of these collections".

Basavanna grew up in a family with a tradition of Shaivism. This movement shared its roots in the ongoing Tamil Bhakti movement , particularly the Shaiva Nayanars traditions, over the 7th- to 11th-century. However, Basava championed devotional worship that rejected temple worship and rituals led by Brahmins and replaced it with personalized direct worship of Shiva through practices such as individually worn icons and symbols like a small linga.

This approach brought Shiva's presence to everyone and at all times, without gender, class or caste discrimination. A recurring contrast in his poems and ideas is of Sthavara and Jangama , that is, of "what is static, standing" and "what is moving, seeking" respectively.

Temples, ancient books represented the former, while work and discussion represented the latter. The rich will make temples for Shiva, What shall I, a poor man do? My legs are pillars, the body the shrine, the head a cupola of gold. Listen, O lord Kudalasangama, things standing shall fall, but the moving ever shall stay.

Basavanna emphasized constant personal spiritual development as the path to profound enlightenment. He championed the use of vernacular language, Kannada , in all spiritual discussions so that translation and interpretation by the elite is unnecessary, and everyone can understand the spiritual ideas.

Basavanna established, in 12th-century, Anubhava Mantapa , a hall for gathering and discussion of spiritual ideas by any member of the society from both genders, where ardent devotees of Shiva shared their achievements and spiritual poems in the local language. The lord Kudalasangama, self-born, one with himself, he alone is the true god. While Lord Basavanna rejected rituals, he encouraged icons and symbols such as the wearing of Istalinga necklace with personal linga, symbol of Shiva , of Rudraksha seeds or beads on parts of one body, and apply Vibhuti sacred ash on forehead as a constant reminder of one's devotion and principles of faith.

The Basava Purana, in Chapter 1, presents a series of impassioned debates between Basava and his father. Basava's father favors the tradition of rituals, while Basava favors the path of direct, personal devotion bhakti. According to Velcheru Rao and Gene Roghair, [27] Basava calls the path of devotion as "beyond six systems of philosophy. Sruti has commended it as the all-seeing. The form of that divine linga is the true God. The guru [teacher] of the creed is an embodiment of kindness and compassion.

He places God in your soul, and he also places God in your hand. The six-syllabled mantra , [28] the supreme mantra, is its mantra. The dress — locks of hair, ashes and rudrashaka beads — place a man beyond the cycle of birth and death. It follows the path of liberation. This path offers nothing less than liberation in this lifetime. Sripati, a Virasaiva scholar, explained Basava's philosophy in Srikara Bhasya , using the Vedanta Sutra , suggesting Basava's Lingayat theology to be a form of qualified nondualism, wherein the individual Atma soul is the body of God, and that there is no difference between Shiva and Atma self, soul , Shiva is one's Atma, one's Atma is Shiva.

However, Sripati's analysis has been contested by other scholars. The Lingayats, also known as Virasaivas or Veerasaivas , traditionally believe that Basava was the founder of their tradition.

The community is largely concentrated in Karnataka , but has migrated into other states of India as well as overseas. Towards the end of the 20th century, Michael estimates, one-sixth of the population of the state of Karnataka, or about 10 million people, were Lingayat Hindus, or of the tradition championed by Basava.

Basava advocated that every human being was equal, irrespective of caste and that all forms of manual labor was equally important. Basavanna is credited with uniting diverse spiritual trends during his era. Jan Peter Schouten states that Virashaivism , the movement championed by Basava, tends towards monotheism with Shiva as the godhead, but with a strong awareness of the unity of the Ultimate Reality.

Jessica Frazier et al. Basava advocated the wearing of Ishtalinga , a necklace with pendant that contains a small Shiva linga. Many contemporary Vachanakaras people who have scripted Vachanas have described him as Swayankrita Sahaja , which means "self-made".

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Basavana Bagewadi , in Vijayapura district , Karnataka , India. Kudalasangama , Karnataka, India. Further information: Vachana sahitya.

Ramanujan Princeton University Press. Retrieved 18 April Archived from the original on 27 May Retrieved 18 June Sivanandan 11 February The Hindu. Retrieved 7 September Lingayatism Topics. History of Lingayatism. List of Lingayats. Category Hinduism portal.

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Guru Basava Selected Vachanas

Basavanna was active during the rule of both dynasties but reached his peak of influence during the rule of King Bijjala II in Karnataka , India. Basavanna spread social awareness through his poetry, popularly known as Vachanaas. As the chief minister of his kingdom, he introduced new public institutions such as the Anubhava Mantapa or, the "hall of spiritual experience" , [7] which welcomed men and women from all socio-economic backgrounds to discuss spiritual and mundane questions of life, in open. The traditional legends and hagiographic texts state Basava to be the founder of the Lingayats. However, modern scholarship relying on historical evidence such as the Kalachuri inscriptions state that Basava was the poet philosopher who revived, refined and energized an already existing tradition. Basavanna literary works include the Vachana Sahitya in Kannada Language.

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Account Options Sign in. Top charts. New releases. Basavanna Vachanagalu Delizent Solutions Lifestyle. Add to Wishlist. There is a very strong likelyhood that the later day Harihara of Karnataka were influenced by the vachanas of Basavanna and others of the 12th century. Here are some of my favorite vachanas written by Lord Basavanna.

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