CURSE OF THE CHTHONIANS PDF

That review is right on the money. I picked up a copy, but I find it a little disappointing that more wasn't done. I find Chaosium's whole model really outdated in contrast to Pagan Publishing, MRP Pelgrane Press who are putting out some really interesting products. I played through all the scenarios God, was it really 27 years ago?

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This compilation of scenarios was one that I initially found a major mixed bag, though in retrospect, part of my problem with this was a reluctance when I first read it to alter published scenarios from their initial form. Four scenarios fill out this book, with a small article at the end elaborating on a concept that the fourth scenario uses.

This scenario involves a circus with a dark secret, a basic concept that has shown up in occasional films and stories, and a few scenarios over the years. Disappearances and a few deaths, one maiming and madness seem vaguely connected to an amusement park near Providence, Rhode Island. Investigation uncovers a more definite connection as they discover a cult whose members are the workers of this carnival, all or nearly all of them.

To be honest, though, I suspect that getting to that monster may be a bigger challenge, this carnival is well populated and a party of investigators could find themselves confronting dozens of cultists, each a deadly opponent. To further complicate the situation, some innocents or relatively innocents, rather may be working at the park, including some rented space inside the park.

There is a cluster of ghouls in subterranean caverns, and a Chthonian to be met as well with at least hints of more of them lurking nearby.

This scenario is, in my opinion, the best in the book, with at least a few excellent elements for inclusion in a campaign, and one of the best role playing challenges a Keeper can throw at a player in the long run, if one of the options is played out. It does lead the players more than a little, and keep them from knowing all that is going on around them for much of its duration, and calls for considerable care in running it properly, notably to keep the players from feeling that they are being herded through a course of events.

A required story hook is a female NPC who is an ex-girlfriend of one of the investigators, with some tender feelings remaining between the two. Said ex calls in the investigators because of some concerns of hers over dreams she has been having and odd behavior on the part of her father, a noted archaeologist. As indicated by the name, the Great Old One Chaugnar Faugn is involved in the story, believed by all to be a statue at the local museum.

The father indicated above has been driven mad by the Great Old One and a curse placed on him that is tying him inevitably to the entity. While his behavior is erratic, there is little perceived reason to believe the professor has gone mad, and the connection to Chaugnar Faugn may be clear to the players, but should not be to the characters ironically, in spite of a personal fondness for this Great Old One, it may be necessary to switch for another entity to come up with something less obvious or the Keeper may have to obscure the nature of the entity a bit this latter is the course I would recommend.

Another conflict leads to an apparent suspect for the investigators, and the resolution of this last conflict appears to wrap up the scenario. In fact, the scenario as written is really just getting warmed up and its deeper secrets just began to be put into play. The campaign resumes, and this scenario takes a pause of sorts, with the daughter an intermittent npc, but remaining part of the situation. Otherwise a fabulous scenario. This scenario is well-written, well-presented, but is also a bit problematic for me in some of its very important elements.

At an auction, an antique dagger An Egyptian magic item is bid over, and subsequently stolen in the conclusion of the auction.

Player characters become involved in the chase for the thief, and end up in possession of the dagger and inherit its curse. With a cultist hounding them from hiding if possible, the players are drawn to ruins in Egypt that are either unexplored or underexplored, and the party will find themselves ultimately in subterranean chambers, confronting Nyarlathotep himself in one of his more human guises. The scenario resolves in a tough combat but the players do have the weapon in hand to make it more workable, even if still tough.

Of course, after the combat, the ritual must still be performed, which will effectively destroy the dagger and the party may well have to fight their way out of their location, so it is open to interpretation if they won or not, even after defeating Nyarlathotep. There is another concern about this scenario for me. At least in part because of the ties between Nyarlathotep and ancient Egypt, CoC scenarios set in Egyptian ruins abound.

Many of them are pretty much death traps, but not all, this is a tough one, a very tough one, and not the best written among them. It is a far cry from the worst, however, and worth some level of inclusion.

I would possibly consider blending it with another scenario, and doing something to give the players some better feeling of hope on getting out of the situation at the end of the scenario. This scenario leads players on an expedition to the Nameless City, and while there are parts of this scenario I love, the hook and the pivotal portions of the conclusion are not among those parts. Dreams that persist for investigators, when researched, lead said investigators to a scholar of the Kaballah, who starts the players on a path that leads ultimately to a quest to find the Nameless City itself.

The path to the city has some of the best elements in the scenario including a traitor in their midst, and the scenario built in such a way that said traitor can be any of several npcs the players will be interacting with. The key to escaping this trap of a feeding ground lies in telepathic messages asking them for the numeric values of Kabbalah interpretations of the name Cthulhu.

If you can, then this scenario may be worth a closer look. I will admit though, that I could enjoy using a large part of the middle of this one in other scenarios. It was still worth the money to me. Postscript: the addendum article in this is a quick summary of Gemmatria, the numerological component of Kabbalah studies.

Again, this is a concept I have issues with, so I cannot personally recommend it in any way. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. Scenario One: Dark Carnival This scenario involves a circus with a dark secret, a basic concept that has shown up in occasional films and stories, and a few scenarios over the years.

Scenario Two: The Curse of Chaugnar Faugn This scenario is, in my opinion, the best in the book, with at least a few excellent elements for inclusion in a campaign, and one of the best role playing challenges a Keeper can throw at a player in the long run, if one of the options is played out. The spoilers go into high gear at this point.

Scenario Four: The City Without a Name This scenario leads players on an expedition to the Nameless City, and while there are parts of this scenario I love, the hook and the pivotal portions of the conclusion are not among those parts. Share this: Twitter Facebook. Like this: Like Loading Leave a Reply Cancel reply Enter your comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:.

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EAT PRAY LOVE KERRELYN SPARKS PDF

Call of Cthulhu Scenario Reviews

This compilation of scenarios was one that I initially found a major mixed bag, though in retrospect, part of my problem with this was a reluctance when I first read it to alter published scenarios from their initial form. Four scenarios fill out this book, with a small article at the end elaborating on a concept that the fourth scenario uses. This scenario involves a circus with a dark secret, a basic concept that has shown up in occasional films and stories, and a few scenarios over the years. Disappearances and a few deaths, one maiming and madness seem vaguely connected to an amusement park near Providence, Rhode Island. Investigation uncovers a more definite connection as they discover a cult whose members are the workers of this carnival, all or nearly all of them. To be honest, though, I suspect that getting to that monster may be a bigger challenge, this carnival is well populated and a party of investigators could find themselves confronting dozens of cultists, each a deadly opponent. To further complicate the situation, some innocents or relatively innocents, rather may be working at the park, including some rented space inside the park.

COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS JOS THIJSSEN PDF

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This is another excellent scenario pack produced originally by Chaosium back in The underlying theme of the book was "earth dwellers" and all four of the scenarios involve going underground or creatures of the earth as opposed to the sea or the air or the Dreamlands in some way. The Scenario pack contains four scenarios including "Dark Carnival," an unpleasantly Stephen King-ish kind of adventure with many different levels of drama for the investigators to uncover; "The Curse of Shaugnar Faugn," a very dangerous adventure almost guaranteed to kill off one or more investigators -- especially if they are inexperienced -- and with plenty of plot twists and turns; and finally, a two-scenario mini-campaign that drives the players into Egypt and the Arabian peninsula composed of "Thoth's Dagger," and "The City Without a Name. Finally, the book contains an essay on "the Kabbalistic Science of Gematria," which describes Gematria the science of assigning numerical values to letters in the alphabet in order to determine mystical links between words -- historically done in the Torah -- thus the "Kabbalistic Science" -- though it could be done with any language in game terms. The article provides enough information that it could be easily used as an adventure hook, or as an apparent plot hook that turns out to be a harmless red herring, and is just plain interesting regardless. The reproduction provided by DriveThru RPG is excellent -- even the illustrations which I would have expected to have been nearly illegible came out as actual pictures instead of blobs of gray and all the information is very easy to read and clear.

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